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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5910174, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5910174
Research Article

Episodic Frequency of Energy-Dense Food Consumption in Women with Excessive Adiposity

Medical Sciences Research Centre, Autonomous University of the State of Mexico, Toluca, MEX, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Antonio Laguna-Camacho; xm.xemeau@acanugala

Received 11 July 2017; Revised 23 September 2017; Accepted 18 October 2017; Published 8 November 2017

Academic Editor: Mangesh S. Pednekar

Copyright © 2017 Antonio Laguna-Camacho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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