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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6436130, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6436130
Review Article

The Complexity of Zoonotic Filariasis Episystem and Its Consequences: A Multidisciplinary View

1Laboratory of Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
2Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Salamanca (IRNASA-CSIC), Salamanca, Spain
3Department of Infectious Diseases, Rostov State Medical University, Rostov-na-Donu, Russia

Correspondence should be addressed to Javier González-Miguel; se.lasu@zelgj

Received 28 March 2017; Accepted 9 May 2017; Published 31 May 2017

Academic Editor: Stephen Munga

Copyright © 2017 Fernando Simón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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