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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6820482, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6820482
Research Article

Evaluation of a Compact Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface System

1Machine Learning Group, Berlin Institute of Technology, Berlin, Germany
2Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
3NIRx Medizintechnik GmbH, Berlin, Germany
4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yeosu, Republic of Korea
5Department of Medical IT Convergence Engineering, Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Do-Won Kim; ed.nilreb-ut.supmac@mik.now-od and Han-Jeong Hwang; rk.ca.homuk@j2h

Received 28 July 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016; Published 8 March 2017

Academic Editor: Maria G. Knyazeva

Copyright © 2017 Jaeyoung Shin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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