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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6894026, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6894026
Research Article

Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts

1Department of Biochemistry, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Level 17, Preclinical Building, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Department of Physiology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Level 18, Preclinical Building, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence should be addressed to Suzana Makpol; ym.ude.mku.mkupp@lopkamanazus

Received 22 November 2016; Revised 31 March 2017; Accepted 13 April 2017; Published 17 May 2017

Academic Editor: Adair Santos

Copyright © 2017 Lina Wati Durani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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