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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7268521, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7268521
Review Article

Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

1Vascular Biology Center, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Brian K. Stansfield

Received 1 November 2016; Accepted 15 December 2016; Published 2 January 2017

Academic Editor: Xuwei Hou

Copyright © 2017 Ha Won Kim and Brian K. Stansfield. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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