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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8032910, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8032910
Research Article

RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis

1Division of Gene Regulation, Institute for Advanced Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
3Department of Breast Surgical Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
4The Center for Integrated Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
5Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
6Laboratory of Gene Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Yoshimi Arima; pj.oiek.7z@amira

Received 28 August 2016; Revised 18 November 2016; Accepted 7 December 2016; Published 22 January 2017

Academic Editor: Ernesto Picardi

Copyright © 2017 Ryo Sato et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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