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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8104397, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8104397
Research Article

Cognitive-Behavioral Coping, Illness Perception, and Family Adaptability in Oncological Patients with a Family History of Cancer

1Department of Oncogenetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa” of Iasi and Institute of Oncology, Iasi, Romania
2Behavioral Sciences Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa” of Iasi, Iasi, Romania
3Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa” of Iasi, Iasi, Romania
4Department of Oncogenetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa” of Iasi, Iasi, Romania

Correspondence should be addressed to Magdalena Iorga; moc.oohay@agroiadgam

Received 6 December 2016; Revised 15 February 2017; Accepted 13 March 2017; Published 23 March 2017

Academic Editor: Fulvio Braido

Copyright © 2017 Roxana Postolica et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. The study investigated the differences between patients with and without a family history of cancer regarding coping strategies, illness perception, and family adaptability to the disease. Material and Methods. A total of 124 patients diagnosed with cancer were included in the research (55 of them with a family history of cancer). The Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, the Strategic Approach to Coping Scale, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale, and the Illness Perception Questionnaire were applied. The data were processed using the SPSS 21 software. Results. Patients with previous records of cancer in the family get significantly higher scores for the illness coherence factor. Family satisfaction is significantly higher for patients with a genetic risk, compared to the one reported by patients who suffer from the disease but have no genetic risk. Cognitive-behavioral coping strategies and family cohesion are factors that correlate with an adaptive perception of the illness in the case of patients with a family history of cancer. Conclusion. Results are important for the construction of strategies used for patients with a family history of cancer.