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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8109205, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8109205
Research Article

Peripheral Antinociception Induced by Aripiprazole Is Mediated by the Opioid System

Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Thiago Roberto Lima Romero; moc.liamg@oremoriht

Received 30 March 2017; Accepted 1 June 2017; Published 3 July 2017

Academic Editor: Gianluca Coppola

Copyright © 2017 Renata Cristina Mendes Ferreira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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