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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8534371, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8534371
Review Article

Breast Carcinoma: From Initial Tumor Cell Detachment to Settlement at Secondary Sites

Biochemistry and Tumor Biology Lab, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Ralf Hass; ed.revonnah-hm@flar.ssah

Received 6 March 2017; Revised 11 May 2017; Accepted 8 June 2017; Published 12 July 2017

Academic Editor: Jeroen T. Buijs

Copyright © 2017 Catharina Melzer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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