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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8564601, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8564601
Research Article

In Vitro Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Alimentary Canal Extracts from the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier Larvae

1Deanship of Scientific Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80230, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Economic Entomology and Pesticides, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
3Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80402, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence should be addressed to Gamal H. Sewify; moc.oohay@ge_yfiwes

Received 25 January 2017; Revised 9 April 2017; Accepted 23 April 2017; Published 22 May 2017

Academic Editor: Yu-Chang Tyan

Copyright © 2017 Gamal H. Sewify et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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