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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8570960, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8570960
Clinical Study

Effects of Gait Self-Efficacy and Lower-Extremity Physical Function on Dual-Task Performance in Older Adults

1University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
2Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA
3University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA
4Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
5Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Diane K. Ehlers; ude.sionilli@srelhekd

Received 29 June 2016; Revised 9 December 2016; Accepted 10 January 2017; Published 1 February 2017

Academic Editor: Erwin van Wegen

Copyright © 2017 Diane K. Ehlers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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