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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8915104, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8915104
Research Article

A 10-Year Follow-Up of Two-Incision and Modified Watson-Jones Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan
2Change Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Tsan-Wen Huang; wt.gro.hmgc.mda@1801068b and Mel S. Lee; moc.rotcod@enob

Received 25 January 2017; Revised 24 February 2017; Accepted 1 March 2017; Published 12 March 2017

Academic Editor: Akihiro Sudo

Copyright © 2017 Shih-Jie Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Long-term data and information indicating whether minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches are safe and effective with total hip arthroplasty (THA) are lacking. Between 2004 and 2006, 75 patients with alcohol-related osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) who underwent 75 THAs with the two-incision approach were studied. The medical records, radiographic parameters, and functional outcomes were collected prospectively. All data were compared with those for matched patients who underwent a modified Watson-Jones (WJ) approach. THA using the two-incision approach was associated with longer operation time, more blood loss, more lateral femoral cutaneous nerve injury, and more periprosthetic femoral fractures ( for all four) than the modified WJ approach. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) increased significantly from the period preoperatively to 6 weeks postoperatively and thereafter up to the last follow-up in both groups. However, there were no significant differences in terms of radiographic parameters and functional outcomes between the two groups throughout the study period. Both the two-incision and the modified WJ approach provided satisfactory results and survival rates at a mean follow-up of 10.8 years. A prospective, randomized, large-scale cohort study is still warranted for evidence-based recommendations.