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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8972678, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8972678
Research Article

Nutraceutical, Anti-Inflammatory, and Immune Modulatory Effects of β-Glucan Isolated from Yeast

1Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan
2Department of Microbiology, University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan

Correspondence should be addressed to Muhammad Nasir

Received 26 January 2017; Accepted 2 April 2017; Published 23 August 2017

Academic Editor: Kazim Husain

Copyright © 2017 Umar Bacha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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