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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9351507, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9351507
Review Article

Proteobacteria: A Common Factor in Human Diseases

Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Policlinico “A. Gemelli” Hospital, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to A. Gasbarrini; ti.ttacinu@inirrabsag.oinotna

Received 5 July 2017; Accepted 16 October 2017; Published 2 November 2017

Academic Editor: Filippo Canducci

Copyright © 2017 G. Rizzatti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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