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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9716087, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9716087
Research Article

Downregulation of Profilin-1 Expression Attenuates Cardiomyocytes Hypertrophy and Apoptosis Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products in H9c2 Cells

1Department of Cardiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
2Department of Cardiology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410006, China
3Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330006, China
4Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Tianlun Yang; moc.361@ynulnait and Meifang Chen; moc.uhos@121gnafiem

Received 15 June 2017; Revised 8 September 2017; Accepted 4 October 2017; Published 7 November 2017

Academic Editor: Shoichiro Ono

Copyright © 2017 Dafeng Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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