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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1650456, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1650456
Research Article

Intermittent Hypoxia Enhances THP-1 Monocyte Adhesion and Chemotaxis and Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization via RAGE

Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Wei Zhang; moc.361@nixuiliewgnahz

Received 7 April 2018; Revised 20 June 2018; Accepted 3 July 2018; Published 8 October 2018

Academic Editor: Cheng-I Cheng

Copyright © 2018 Jing Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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