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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1854269, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1854269
Research Article

Whole-Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation of LRRC6 in a Chinese Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patient

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Respiratory Disease, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Hong Luo; nc.ude.usc@8071808022

Received 28 July 2017; Accepted 7 December 2017; Published 8 January 2018

Academic Editor: Mitsuru Nakazawa

Copyright © 2018 Lv Liu and Hong Luo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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