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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 2547532, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2547532
Research Article

Involvement of Cholinergic Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in the Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Learning and Memory in Rats

1School of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
2The Affiliated (TCM) Hospital/School of Pharmacy/Sino-Portugal TCM International Cooperation Center, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000, China
3State Key Laboratory of Space Medicine Fundamentals and Application, China Astronaut Research and Training Center, Beijing 100094, China
4Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yinghui Li; moc.anis.piv@ddiuhgniy and Lina Qu; ten.362@uqanil

Received 7 September 2017; Revised 1 January 2018; Accepted 11 January 2018; Published 8 February 2018

Academic Editor: Jack van Horssen

Copyright © 2018 Yongliang Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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