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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 2754941, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2754941
Review Article

MicroRNA-Mediated Regulation of HMGB1 in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

1Department of General Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital Affiliated to Medical College of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016, China
2Institute of Occupational Diseases, Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences, Hangzhou 310013, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiujun Cai; nc.ude.ujz@7144900

Jianing Yan and Shibo Ying contributed equally to this work.

Received 6 November 2017; Accepted 4 January 2018; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Shinichi Aishima

Copyright © 2018 Jianing Yan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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