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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 3180413, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3180413
Review Article

Neuronal Proteomic Analysis of the Ubiquitinated Substrates of the Disease-Linked E3 Ligases Parkin and Ube3a

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU), 48940 Leioa, Spain
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU), 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
3Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Ugo Mayor; sue.uhe@royam.ogu

Received 23 November 2017; Accepted 15 January 2018; Published 6 March 2018

Academic Editor: Louise Cheng

Copyright © 2018 Aitor Martinez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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