Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 3904139, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3904139
Research Article

The Effects of Tooth Brushing on Whole Salivary Flow Rate in Older Adults

1Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, College of Health Professions, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, USA
2Graduate Program of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada
3Department of Psychology, Western University, London, ON, Canada
4Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, Western University, London, ON, Canada
5School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Elborn College, Western University, London, ON, Canada
6Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada
7Department of Dentistry, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada
8Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to R. E. Martin; ac.owu@nitramer

Received 11 October 2017; Accepted 17 January 2018; Published 26 February 2018

Academic Editor: Asta Tvarijonaviciute

Copyright © 2018 R. H. Affoo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. (1) To determine whether manual (MTB), or electric, tooth brushing (ETB) modulates whole salivary flow rate in older adults who are free of systemic disease. (2) To determine the duration of the brushing-related modulation of salivary flow rate. (3) To compare salivary flow rate modulation associated with MTB and ETB. Method. Twenty-one adults aged 60 years and older participated in two experimental sessions during which they used a manual, or electric, toothbrush to brush their teeth, tongue, and palate. Whole salivary flow rates were determined using the draining method before, during, and after brushing. Differences in salivary flow rates across time periods, and between conditions, were examined using paired samples -tests applying a Holm-Bonferroni sequential procedure (). The relationship between tooth brushing and age with respect to maximum salivary flow rate increase was examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient (). Results/Conclusion. Whole salivary flow rates increased during, and for up to 5 minutes following, tooth brushing in adults aged 60 years and older who were free of systemic disease. The salivary effects of MTB and ETB were not significantly different. A moderate, positive correlation was observed between tooth-brushing-related maximum salivary flow rate increase and age.