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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 5427201, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5427201
Research Article

Office-Cycling: A Promising Way to Raise Pain Thresholds and Increase Metabolism with Minimal Compromising of Work Performance

1Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
2Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, Jordanstown, UK
3Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Rebecca Tronarp; moc.liamg@pranortacceber

Received 14 August 2017; Revised 1 December 2017; Accepted 19 December 2017; Published 23 January 2018

Academic Editor: Nikolaos G. Koulouris

Copyright © 2018 Rebecca Tronarp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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