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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 6280969, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6280969
Research Article

Transient Abnormalities in Masking Tuning Curve in Early Progressive Hearing Loss Mouse Model

1Neurosensory Biophysics, INSERM UMR 1107, Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France
2Speech Therapy and Audiology Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Cellular Health Imaging Center, Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Fabrice Giraudet

Received 10 October 2017; Accepted 26 December 2017; Published 13 February 2018

Academic Editor: Jeong-Han Lee

Copyright © 2018 Marion Souchal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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