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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 6293847, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6293847
Research Article

Development of Chloroplast Genomic Resources in Chinese Yam (Dioscorea polystachya)

1State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Dao-di Herbs, National Resource Center for Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
2Center for Postdoctoral Research, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China
3Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China
4School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 102488, China
5Department of Immunology, Medical College, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430065, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Qingjun Yuan; nc.ca.mmci@nujgniqnauy and Luqi Huang; moc.621@10iqulgnauh

Received 8 December 2017; Accepted 1 February 2018; Published 14 March 2018

Academic Editor: Atanas Atanassov

Copyright © 2018 Junling Cao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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