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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 9192104, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9192104
Review Article

Update of ALDH as a Potential Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for AML

1Department of Hematology, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China
2Department of Rheumatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Hong Wang; moc.621@gnohgnawzw

Received 29 September 2017; Accepted 17 December 2017; Published 3 January 2018

Academic Editor: Anne Hamburger

Copyright © 2018 Xiangchou Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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