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BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 5320747, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/5320747
Research Article

Role of PKR in the Inhibition of Proliferation and Translation by Polycystin-1

1Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun 130041, China
2Membrane Protein Disease Research Group, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2H7, Canada
3National “111” Center for Cellular Regulation and Molecular Pharmaceutics, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430086, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jianzheng Yang; moc.361@5002gnehzjgnay and Zuocheng Wang; moc.361@gnawgnehcouz

Received 15 February 2019; Revised 19 May 2019; Accepted 2 June 2019; Published 23 June 2019

Academic Editor: Paul M. Tulkens

Copyright © 2019 Yan Tang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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