Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 8382160, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8382160
Research Article

Comparability of Self-Ratings and Observer Ratings in Occupational Psychosocial Risk Assessments: Is There Agreement?

Teaching and Research Area for Occupational Health Psychology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Isabell Schneider; ed.nehcaa-htwr@redienhcs.llebasi

Received 16 March 2019; Revised 21 May 2019; Accepted 25 May 2019; Published 12 June 2019

Guest Editor: Giorgi Gabriele

Copyright © 2019 Isabell Schneider et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. M. A. Kompier, C. L. Cooper, and S. A. Geurts, “A multiple case study approach to work stress prevention in Europe,” European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 371–400, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. M. Hofmann, L. P. Hölzel, F. Frank, and M. Berger, “Gefährdungsbeurteilung bei psychischen Überlastungen am Arbeitsplatz Ein innereuropäischer Vergleich [Risk assessment for mental stress at work An intra-European comparison] ASU Arbeitsmedizin – Sozialmedizin – Umweltmedizin,” Zeitschrift für medizinische Prävention, vol. 50, pp. 515–521, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  3. O. Vargas, J. Flintrop, J. Hassard et al., Psychosocial risks in Europe: prevalence and strategies for prevention, Eurofound, and EU-OSH, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2014.
  4. S. G. van den, M. C. Heuvel, I. Eekhout, and A. Venema, “Management of psychosocial risks in European workplaces - evidence from the second European survey of enterprises on new and emerging risks (ESENER-2),” in European Risk Observatory, Report, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2018. View at Google Scholar
  5. N. Mucci, G. Giorgi, M. Roncaioli, J. F. Perez, and G. Arcangeli, “The correlation between stress and economic crisis: a systematic review,” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, vol. 12, pp. 983–993, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. Houdmont, R. Kerr, and K. Addley, “Psychosocial factors and economic recession: the stormont study,” Occupational Medicine, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 98–104, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. J. Greenberg, “Losing sleep over organizational injustice: attenuating insomniac reactions to underpayment inequity with supervisory training in interactional justice,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 58–69, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. G. Giorgi, G. Arcangeli, N. Mucci, and V. Cupelli, “Economic stress in the workplace: the impact of fear of the crisis on mental health,” Work, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 135–142, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. M. Kompier, “Assessing the psychosocial work environment—'subjective' versus 'objective' measurement,” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 405–408, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. T. Theorell and H. M. Hasselhorn, “On cross-sectional questionnaire studies of relationships between psychosocial conditions at work and health—are they reliable?” International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol. 78, no. 7, pp. 517–522, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. N. Gebele, K. Morling, U. Rösler, and R. Rau, “Objective assessment of job demands and decision latitude and the relationship of the job characteristics to relaxation ability,” Zeitschrift für Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie A&O, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 32–45, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. R. Rau, “Questioning or observation or both together? — which instruments should be used when psychic work load and strain have to be analyzed?” Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie, vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 294–301, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. S. Zoni and R. G. Lucchini, “European approaches to work-related stress: a critical review on risk evaluation,” Safety and Health at Work, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 43–49, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. A. Ostry, S. Marion, P. Demers et al., “Measuring psychosocial job strain with the job content questionnaire using experienced job evaluators,” American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 397–401, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. J. Prümper, K. Hartmannsgruber, and M. Frese, “Short questionnaire for job analysis,” Zeitschrift für Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie, vol. 3, pp. 125–132, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  16. I. Schneider, M. Mädler, C. Clos, and J. Lang, “Practical and scientifically based assessment of psychological working conditions – is that even possible?” in Proceedings of the Poster presentation at the 57 Conference of the German Association for Occupational and Environmental Medicine (DGAUM), Hamburg, Germany, 2017.
  17. F. P. Morgeson and S. E. Humphrey, “The work design questionnaire (WDQ): developing and validating a comprehensive measure for assessing job design and the nature of work,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 91, no. 6, pp. 1321–1339, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. N. Semmer, D. Zapf, and H. Dunckel, “Instrument for stress-related activity analysis,” in Handbuch psychologischer Arbeitsanalyseverfahren, H. Dunckel, Ed., pp. 181–204, Hochschulverlag AG an der ETH Zürich, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  19. A. Tomaschek, S. S. L. Lanfer, M. Melzer, U. Debitz, and G. Buruck, “Measuring work-related psychosocial and physical risk factors using workplace observations: a validation study of the “healthy workplace screening”,” Safety Science, vol. 101, pp. 197–208, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  20. P. D. Bliese, “Within-group agreement, non-independence, and reliability: implications for data aggregation and analysis,” in Multilevel Theory, Research, and Methods in Organizations, K. J. Klein and S. W. J. Kozlowski, Eds., pp. 349–381, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, Calif, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  21. E. C. Dierdorff and M. A. Wilson, “A meta-analysis of job analysis reliability,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 635–646, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. O. F. Voskuijl and T. van Sliedregt, “Determinants of interrater reliability of job analysis: a meta-analysis,” European Journal of Psychological Assessment, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 52–62, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. N. Semmer, D. Zapf, and S. Greif, “‘Shared job strain’: a new approach for assessing the validity of job stress measurements,” Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 293–310, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. M. Frese and D. Zapf, “Methodological issues in the study of work stress: objective vs. subjective measurement of work stress and the question of longitudinal studies,” in Causes, Coping, and Consequences of Stress at Work, C. Cooper and R. Payne, Eds., pp. 375–411, Wiley, England, 1988. View at Google Scholar
  25. P. E. Spector and S. Fox, “Reducing subjectivity in the assessment of the job environment: development of the factual autonomy scale (FAS),” Journal of Organizational Behavior, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 417–432, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. Council of the European Union, “Introduction of measures to encourage improvements in the safety and health of workers at work,” Official Journal of the European Communities, vol. 32, 1989, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=OJ:L:1989:183:TOC. View at Google Scholar
  27. R. Rugulies, “Studying the effect of the psychosocial work environment on risk of ill-health: towards a more comprehensive assessment of working conditions,” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 187–191, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. M. LeBreton and J. L. Senter, “Answers to 20 questions about interrater reliability and interrater agreement,” Organizational Research Methods, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 815–852, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  29. M. Mädler, C. Spreckelsen, I. Schneider, and J. Lang, “User focused development of an online tool for psychological risk assessment at work,” in Proceedings of the Poster presentation at the General Online Research Conference (GOR) of the German Association for Online-Research (DGOF e.V.), Cologne, Germany, 2018.
  30. P. D. Bliese, Multilevel modeling in R (2.6): A brief introduction to R, the multilevel package and the nlme package, 2016, https://cran.r-project.org/doc/contrib/Bliese_Multilevel.pdf.
  31. R Development Core Team, R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria, 2017, https://www.R-project.org/.
  32. L. R. James, R. G. Demaree, and G. Wolf, “Estimating within-group interrater reliability with and without response bias,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 85–98, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. W. P. Dunlap, M. J. Burke, and K. Smith-Crowe, “Accurate tests of statistical significance for rwg and average deviation interrater agreement indices,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 356–362, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. J. L. Fleiss, The Design and Analysis of Clinical Experiments, John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY, USA, 1986.
  35. “IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, V.A., NY: IBM Corp, 2017”.
  36. S. Sonnentag and C. Fritz, “Recovery from job stress: the stressor-detachment model as an integrative framework,” Journal of Organizational Behavior, vol. 36, no. S1, pp. 72–103, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. M. Sianoja, C. J. Syrek, J. de Bloom, K. Korpela, and U. Kinnunen, “Enhancing daily well-being at work through lunchtime park walks and relaxation exercises: recovery experiences as mediators,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 428–442, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. D. A. Commissaris, M. A. Huysmans, S. E. Mathiassen, D. Srinivasan, L. L. Koppes, and I. J. Hendriksen, “Interventions to reduce sedentary behavior and increase physical activity during productive work: a systematic review,” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 181–191, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  39. C. Mainsbridge, K. Ahuja, A. Williams, M. Bird, D. Cooley, and S. J. Pedersen, “Blood pressure response to interrupting workplace sitting time with non-exercise physical activity,” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 769–774, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar