BioMed Research International

From Micro- to Macroscopic Brain Connectivity Using Multiple Modalities


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Published

Lead Editor

1Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China

2McGill University, Montreal, Canada

3University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada


From Micro- to Macroscopic Brain Connectivity Using Multiple Modalities

Description

Brain is the most complex organ in the body. This organ is composed of various interacting units (e.g., single neurons, cortical columns, voxels, and brain areas at microscopic, mesoscopic, or macroscopic scales), which give rise to its functional complexity. With the advent of advanced brain imaging techniques, the study of human brain connectivity in vivo becomes possible and has offered new insights into understanding the cognition and the brain’s information flow in health and disorders. Using different modalities of neuroimaging, both structural and functional brain connectivity can be mapped. The structural connectivity represents the anatomical links between units, such as synapses, fiber bundles, or morphological covariance. The functional connectivity is used to measure the statistical independencies of the functional signals over time between units. By integration of brain units and their interactions, recently, the brain was proposed to be modeled as a network and so was called “human connectome.” The application of network science to the brain has facilitated our understanding of how the brain is structurally and functionally organized. Knowledge about network interactions on and across multiple levels of organization is crucial for a more complete understanding of the brain as an integrated system. Furthermore, studying the brain within this framework has already shed light on how many diseases and disorders affect the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and autism. However, there are still some challenges when mapping, analyzing, and modeling the brain connectivity at different scales.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles to stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the brain connectivity mapping from micro- to macroscopic scales with different imaging techniques.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Mapping the brain connectivity with advanced neuroimaging techniques (e.g., diffusion MRI, structural MRI, functional MRI, PET/SPECT, EEG/MEG, ECG, TMS/Tdcs, and so on)
  • Modeling of stationary and temporal brain connectivity and networks
  • Characterizing the properties and dynamics of brain connectivity and networks
  • Relationship between brain connectivity and cognitive functions
  • Applications of brain connectivity analysis in brain development, aging, and disorders

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 8128095
  • - Editorial

From Micro- to Macroscopic Brain Connectivity Using Multiple Modalities

Ni Shu | Yasser Iturria-Medina | Roberto C. Sotero
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2016
  • - Article ID 7069274
  • - Review Article

Neurolinguistics: Structure, Function, and Connectivity in the Bilingual Brain

Becky Wong | Bin Yin | Beth O’Brien
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 248724
  • - Research Article

FC-NIRS: A Functional Connectivity Analysis Tool for Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Data

Jingping Xu | Xiangyu Liu | ... | Haijing Niu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 915606
  • - Review Article

Modeling the Generation of Phase-Amplitude Coupling in Cortical Circuits: From Detailed Networks to Neural Mass Models

Roberto C. Sotero
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 817595
  • - Research Article

Cortical Structural Connectivity Alterations in Primary Insomnia: Insights from MRI-Based Morphometric Correlation Analysis

Lu Zhao | Enfeng Wang | ... | Yongli Li
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 954901
  • - Review Article

From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training

Tal Dotan Ben-Soussan | Joseph Glicksohn | Aviva Berkovich-Ohana
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 908917
  • - Research Article

Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

Ni Shu | Yaou Liu | ... | Kuncheng Li
BioMed Research International
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Acceptance rate31%
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