BioMed Research International

Chewing, Stress-Related Diseases, and Brain Function


Status
Published

Lead Editor

1Seijoh University Graduate School of Health Care Studies, Tokai, Japan

2Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Yanagido, Japan

3Peking University, Beijing, China

4Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China

5University of South Alabama, Mobile, USA


Chewing, Stress-Related Diseases, and Brain Function

Description

Active mastication or chewing is primarily involved in food intake and digestion, but it also promotes and preserves general health. Epidemiologic studies indicate that aged individuals with tooth loss are more likely to develop cognitive dysfunction. In fact, tooth loss is an epidemiologic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss and occlusal disharmony produce chronic stress, which in turn induces pathologic changes in the hippocampus and learning and memory deficits. Evidence suggests that chewing effectively facilitates information transmission in the brain. Chewing activates brain function, including the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical structures, which are essential for cognitive processing. Chewing gum before a meal can decrease food intake and help prevent obesity via neural pathways. Chewing during stress condition ameliorates stress-induced impairments such as anxiety-like behavior, learning deficits, and gastric ulcer.

We invite authors to submit original research and review articles that seek to explore the relationship between chewing, stress-related disorders, and brain function.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Chewing and cognitive function
  • Chewing and obesity
  • Chewing and stress-related diseases
  • Epidemiologic study on mastication and brain function
  • Motor circuitry of chewing

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 412493
  • - Editorial

Chewing, Stress-Related Diseases, and Brain Function

Kin-ya Kubo | Huayue Chen | ... | Olivier Darbin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 876409
  • - Review Article

Mastication as a Stress-Coping Behavior

Kin-ya Kubo | Mitsuo Iinuma | Huayue Chen
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 149431
  • - Review Article

Chew the Pain Away: Oral Habits to Cope with Pain and Stress and to Stimulate Cognition

Roxane Anthea Francesca Weijenberg | Frank Lobbezoo
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 395705
  • - Research Article

Prefrontal Hemodynamic Changes Associated with Subjective Sense of Occlusal Discomfort

Yumie Ono | Goh Kobayashi | ... | Katsushi Tamaki
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 373769
  • - Research Article

Effects of Mandibular Retrusive Deviation on Prefrontal Cortex Activation: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

Takero Otsuka | Ryuichi Yamasaki | ... | Toshitsugu Kawata
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 654806
  • - Research Article

Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

Andrew P. Allen | Andrew P. Smith
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 294068
  • - Research Article

Chewing Prevents Stress-Induced Hippocampal LTD Formation and Anxiety-Related Behaviors: A Possible Role of the Dopaminergic System

Yumie Ono | So Koizumi | Minoru Onozuka
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 367026
  • - Review Article

Chewing and Attention: A Positive Effect on Sustained Attention

Yoshiyuki Hirano | Minoru Onozuka
BioMed Research International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision81 days
Acceptance to publication54 days
CiteScore2.410
Impact Factor2.197
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