Behavioural Neurology
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Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision89 days
Acceptance to publication22 days
CiteScore4.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.690
Impact Factor3.112

Article of the Year 2021

Revisiting Apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease: From Conceptualization to Therapeutic Approaches

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 Journal profile

Behavioural Neurology provides a platform for researchers and clinicians working in the areas of cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychology, and neuropsychiatry.

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Behavioural Neurology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors expert and up-to-date in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

The Mediating Role of Depression and Pain Catastrophizing in the Relationship between Functional Capacity and Pain Intensity in Patients with Fibromyalgia

Background. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain condition characterized by widespread pain, sleep problems (i.e., insomnia and unrefreshing sleep), fatigue, cognitive, and emotional difficulties. Although pain has been proposed the factor mostly impacting in the FMS patients’ function, emotional and psychological FMS-associated factors are also known to exert a negative impact in quality of life and functional capacity. Nonetheless, the relationship between these factors and functional limitations in FMS patients is considered to be complex and not clearly defined. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the associations between FMS functional capacity, FMS symptoms (pain, fatigue, insomnia, depression, and state and trait anxiety), and associated psychological factors such as pain catastrophizing, as well as the possible mediating role of these latter in the relationship between pain and FMS functional capacity. Method. 115 women diagnoses with FMS completed a set of self-administered questionnaires to evaluate the clinical and psychological variables of the study. Results. FMS functional capacity was positively associated with the majority of FMS symptoms except state anxiety. Regression analyses confirmed a greater prediction for FMS functional capacity by depression, fatigue, and pain catastrophizing, in this sequence. Both, pain catastrophizing and depression were important factors mediating the association between clinical pain (total and intensity) and FMS functional capacity. Conclusions. Findings support a key role of pain catastrophizing and depression in the disability associated to pain in FMS. Treatment goals directed to lessen depression and pain catastrophizing levels should be promoted to reduce the impact of pain in FMS patients’ daily function.

Research Article

Behavioral Analysis of EEG Signals in Loss-Gain Decision-Making Experiments

Extraction and analysis of the EEG (electroencephalograph) information features generated during behavioral decision-making can provide a better understanding of the state of mind. Previous studies have focused more on the brainwave features after behavioral decision-making. In fact, the EEG before decision-making is more worthy of our attention. In this study, we introduce a new index based on the reaction time of subjects before decision-making, called the Prestimulus Time (PT), which have important reference value for the study of cognitive function, neurological diseases, and other fields. In our experiments, we use a wearable EEG feature signal acquisition device and a systematic reward and punishment experiment to obtain the EEG features before and after behavioral decision-making. The experimental results show that the EEG generated after behavioral decision due to loss is more intense than that generated by gain in the medial frontal cortex (MFC). In addition, different characteristics of EEG signals are generated prior to behavioral decisions because people have different expectations of the outcome. It will produce more significant negative-polarity event-related potential (ERP) in the forebrain area when the humans are optimistic about the outcomes.

Research Article

The Effects of Poria cocos on Rho Signaling-Induced Regulation of Mobility and F-Actin Aggregation in MK-801-Treated B35 and C6 Cells

Background and Aim. We recently investigated whether Poria cocos water extract modulates ketamine-induced Rho signaling regulation and reverses ketamine-inhibited cell mobility and F-actin reconstruction in B35 and C6 cells. Various studies have mentioned that drugs of abuse induce changes in neuronal plasticity in the brain’s reward circuitry. Modulations in neuronal plasticity are closely related to Rho signaling regulation in cells. Rho signaling has also been implicated in the addictive behavior induced by chronic opiate or morphine administration. MK-801 could induce Rho signaling regulation to further modulate cell migration and actin reorganization in neuronal and glial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of Poria cocos water extract on Rho signal regulation in MK-801-treated B35 and C6 cells. Methods. B35 neuronal cells and C6 glial cells were incubated with MK-801 for 7 days followed by MK-801, MK801 in combination with water extracts of P. cocos (PRP for P. cocos cum Radix Pini or WP for White Poria) treatment for an additional 7 days. Analysis of cell mobility, F-actin aggregation, and Rho signaling modulation was performed to clarify the roles of PRP or WP in MK-801-treated B35 and C6 cells. Results. MK-801 decreases B35 cell mobility, whereas the inhibited cell migration ability and F-actin aggregation in MK-801-treated B35 or C6 cells could be reversed by PRP or WP. The CDC42 expression in B35 or C6 cells would be reduced by MK-801 and restored by treating with PRP or WP. The RhoA expression was increased by MK-801 in both B35 and C6 cells but was differentially regulated by PRP or WP. In B35 cells, downregulation of PFN1, N-WASP, PAK1, and ARP2/3 induced by MK-801 can be reversely modulated by PRP or WP. PRP or WP reduced the increase in the p-MLC2 expression in B35 cells treated with MK-801. The reduction in ROCK1, PFN1, p-MLC2, and ARP2/3 expression in C6 cells induced by MK-801 was restored by PRP or WP. Reduced N-WASP and PAK1 expression was differentially regulated by PRP or WP in MK-801-treated C6 cells.

Research Article

Variability of Reaction Time as a Marker of Executive Function Impairments in Fibromyalgia

In addition to chronic widespread pain and depression and anxiety symptoms, patients with fibromyalgia frequently experience cognitive problems. This study investigated executive functions in fibromyalgia via a Go/No-Go task. To obtain comprehensive information about performance, traditional and ex-Gaussian parameters of reaction time (RT) variability were used, in addition to speed and accuracy indices. Ex-Gaussian parameters show an excellent fit to empirical RT distributions. Fifty-two female fibromyalgia patients and twenty-eight healthy controls participated. The task included 60 visual stimuli, which participants had to respond to (Go stimuli) or withhold the response to (No-Go stimuli). After 30 trials, the task rule changed, such that previous No-Go stimuli had to be responded to. Performance was indexed by the hit rate, false alarm rate, and mean () and intraindividual standard deviation (SD) of RT and the ex-Gaussian parameters mu, sigma, and tau. Mu and sigma indicate the and SD of the Gaussian distribution; tau reflects the and SD of the exponential function. Patients exhibited a lower hit rate, higher RT, and higher tau than controls. Moreover, patients showed greater decrease of the hit rate after the change of task rule. In the entire sample, SD, sigma, and tau were inversely associated with the hit rate and positively associated with the false alarm rate. While the greater decline in hit rate after the change in task rule indicates deficient cognitive flexibility, the lack of any difference in false alarm rate suggests intact response inhibition. Higher RT reflects reduced cognitive or motor speed. Increased tau in fibromyalgia indicates greater fluctuations in executive control and more frequent temporary lapses of attention. For the first time, this study demonstrated that indices of RT variability, in particular those derived from the ex-Gaussian function, may complement speed and accuracy parameters in the assessment of executive function impairments in fibromyalgia. Optimized assessment may facilitate the personalization of therapies aimed at improving the cognitive function of those with the disorder.

Research Article

Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Stages Using Topological Measures of Resting-State Functional Connectivity Networks: A Comparative Study

Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been widely employed to examine brain functional connectivity (FC) alterations in various neurological disorders. At present, various computational methods have been proposed to estimate connectivity strength between different brain regions, as the edge weight of FC networks. However, little is known about which model is more sensitive to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. This study comparatively characterized topological properties of rs-FC networks constructed with Pearson correlation (PC), dynamic time warping (DTW), and group information guided independent component analysis (GIG-ICA), aimed at investigating the sensitivity and effectivity of these methods in differentiating AD stages. A total of 54 subjects from Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ANDI) database, divided into healthy control (HC), mild cognition impairment (MCI), and AD groups, were included in this study. Network-level (global efficiency and characteristic path length) and nodal (clustering coefficient) metrics were used to capture groupwise difference across HC, MCI, and AD groups. The results showed that almost no significant differences were found according to global efficiency and characteristic path length. However, in terms of clustering coefficient, 52 brain parcels sensitive to AD progression were identified in rs-FC networks built with GIG-ICA, much more than PC (6 parcels) and DTW (3 parcels). This indicates that GIG-ICA is more sensitive to AD progression than PC and DTW. The findings also confirmed that the AD-linked FC alterations mostly appeared in temporal, cingulate, and angular areas, which might contribute to clinical diagnosis of AD. Overall, this study provides insights into the topological properties of rs-FC networks over AD progression, suggesting that FC strength estimation of FC networks cannot be neglected in AD-related graph analysis.

Research Article

Predictors of Successful Memory Aging in Older Mexican Adults

Background. Research suggests a significant association between increasing age and memory impairments. Nevertheless, for some individuals, memory performance stays within or above the normative values of younger subjects. This is known as successful memory aging and is associated with specific neurophysiological features and psychological and lifestyle-related variables. To date, little is known about the association between successful memory aging and intrinsic capacity (IC) defined as “the composite of all the physical and mental (including psychosocial) capacities that an individual can draw on at any point in time” and resilience. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine if longitudinal associations between IC and successful memory aging and resilience exist and to find differences in cognitive performance between Mexican older adults with successful memory aging, older adults with average memory, and older adults with memory impairment. Methods. Longitudinal data from 590 individuals from the third wave (2012) and the Mex-Cog subsample (2016) of the Mexican Health and Aging Study was analysed. Subjects were classified into 3 groups: (1) older adults with successful memory aging (SUMA), (2) older adults with average memory (AVMA), and (3) older adults with memory impairment (IMA). Cognitive domains of orientation, language, attention, constructional praxis, and executive function were evaluated. IC and resilience were measured using items from the MHAS battery. Analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regressions were used to find differences in IC and resilience across the memory aging groups. Results. ANOVAs showed significant differences across the three cognitive performance groups in all cognitive domains. Multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed that respondents with higher scores in the psychological and cognitive domains of IC at baseline were more likely to have successful memory aging in the subsequent wave of the study. More resilient subjects in 2012 were not more likely to become a SUMA in 2016. However, this could be a result of the way resilience was measured. Conclusion. Our main findings suggest that intrinsic capacity could be used as a predictor of successful memory aging specifically in the psychological and the cognitive domains. More longitudinal studies are needed to further examine these associations.

Behavioural Neurology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision89 days
Acceptance to publication22 days
CiteScore4.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.690
Impact Factor3.112
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.