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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 15, Issue 3-4, Pages 55-63
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2004/703746

Training-Based Interventions in Motor Rehabilitation after Stroke: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations

Annette Sterr

Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychology, School of Human Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK

Received 24 January 2005; Accepted 24 January 2005

Copyright © 2004 Hindawi Publishing Corporation and the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [10 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • James Patton, Greg Dawe, Chris Scharver, Ferdinando Mussa-Ivaldi, and Robert Kenyon, “Robotics and Virtual Reality: A Perfect Marriage for Motor Control Research and Rehabilitation,” Assistive Technology, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 181–195, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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  • A Sterr, “Preparing not to move: Does no-response priming affect advance movement preparation processes in a response priming task?,” Biological Psychology, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 154–159, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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  • Steven L. Wolf, “Revisiting constraint-induced movement therapy: Are we too smitten with the mitten? Is all nonuse "learned"? And other quandaries,” Physical Therapy, vol. 87, no. 9, pp. 1212–1223, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • A. Kloth, “Current Aspects of Neurorehabilitation After Stroke,” Fortschritte der Neurologie Psychiatrie, vol. 77, pp. S55–S57, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Sara E. McEwen, Helene J. Polatajko, Jane A. Davis, Maria Huijbregts, and Jennifer D. Ryan, “'There's a real plan here, and I am responsible for that plan': participant experiences with a novel cognitive-based treatment approach for adults living with chronic stroke,” Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 540–550, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • C. Lin, and J. Hawes, “Emerging Subspecialties in Neurology: Neurorehabilitation,” Neurology, vol. 85, no. 5, pp. e50–e52, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Annette Sterr, and Leonardo Furlan, “A case to be made: theoretical and empirical arguments for the need to consider fatigue in post-stroke motor rehabilitation,” Neural Regeneration Research, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 1195, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Leonardo Furlan, Adriana Bastos Conforto, Leonardo G. Cohen, and Annette Sterr, “Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation,” Neural Plasticity, vol. 2016, pp. 1–17, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar