Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Behavioural Neurology
Volume 16 (2005), Issue 4, Pages 211-216
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2005/641953

Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

Yair Lampl,1 Mordechai Lorberboym,2 Ronit Gilad,1 Mona Boaz,3 and Menachem Sadeh1

1Department of Neurology, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
3Epidemiology Unit and the Institute for Cardiovascular Research, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Received 17 February 2006; Accepted 17 February 2006

Copyright © 2005 Hindawi Publishing Corporation and the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.