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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2014, Article ID 260381, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/260381
Review Article

Brain and Language: Evidence for Neural Multifunctionality

Boston University Medical School Department of Neurology, Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center & Language in the Aging Brain, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, 150 South Huntington Avenue (12A), Boston, MA 02130, USA

Received 11 January 2013; Revised 19 March 2014; Accepted 20 March 2014; Published 9 June 2014

Academic Editor: Oliver Wirths

Copyright © 2014 Dalia Cahana-Amitay and Martin L. Albert. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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