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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 183027, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/183027
Research Article

Predicting Early Bulbar Decline in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Speech Subsystem Approach

1Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, 36 First Avenue, Boston, MA 02129, USA
2Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 160-500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1V7
3Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080, USA
4Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235, USA

Received 29 January 2015; Accepted 3 May 2015

Academic Editor: Joao Costa

Copyright © 2015 Panying Rong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. To develop a predictive model of speech loss in persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) based on measures of respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and resonatory functions that were selected using a data-mining approach. Method. Physiologic speech subsystem (respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and resonatory) functions were evaluated longitudinally in 66 individuals with ALS using multiple instrumentation approaches including acoustic, aerodynamic, nasometeric, and kinematic. The instrumental measures of the subsystem functions were subjected to a principal component analysis and linear mixed effects models to derive a set of comprehensive predictors of bulbar dysfunction. These subsystem predictors were subjected to a Kaplan-Meier analysis to estimate the time until speech loss. Results. For a majority of participants, speech subsystem decline was detectible prior to declines in speech intelligibility and speaking rate. Among all subsystems, the articulatory and phonatory predictors were most responsive to early bulbar deterioration; and the resonatory and respiratory predictors were as responsive to bulbar decline as was speaking rate. Conclusions. The articulatory and phonatory predictors are sensitive indicators of early bulbar decline due to ALS, which has implications for predicting disease onset and progression and clinical management of ALS.