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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 231676, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/231676
Review Article

Are Absence Epilepsy and Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy System Epilepsies of the Sleep/Wake System?

National Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Lotz K. u. 18, Budapest 1026, Hungary

Received 27 January 2015; Revised 13 April 2015; Accepted 5 May 2015

Academic Editor: Luigi Ferini-Strambi

Copyright © 2015 Péter Halász. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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