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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 274919, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/274919
Research Article

A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of the Brain of University Students Majoring in Music and Nonmusic Disciplines

1Department of Information and Communication Sciences, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554, Japan
2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
3Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital, Shizuoka 410-2295, Japan

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 28 March 2015; Accepted 29 March 2015

Academic Editor: Shinichi Furuya

Copyright © 2015 Kanako Sato et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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