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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 287843, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/287843
Clinical Study

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Address Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Study

1Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Laboratory, Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Rua Dr. Ovidio Pires de Campos 785, 05402-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Neuroscience (LIM 27), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Rua Dr. Ovidio Pires de Campos 785, 05402-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Division of Neurological Surgery, Pain Center, Department of Neurology, University of São Paulo, Avenida Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, Sala 5084, Cerqueira César, 05403-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 14 November 2014; Revised 5 February 2015; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Liana Palermo

Copyright © 2015 Hellen Livia Drumond Marra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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