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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 707625, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/707625
Research Article

The Influence of Music on Prefrontal Cortex during Episodic Encoding and Retrieval of Verbal Information: A Multichannel fNIRS Study

UMR-CNRS 5022 “Laboratoire d’Etude de l’Apprentissage et du Développement”, Université de Bourgogne, 21000 Dijon, France

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 2 May 2015; Accepted 11 May 2015

Academic Editor: Kentaro Ono

Copyright © 2015 Laura Ferreri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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