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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015, Article ID 797862, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/797862
Research Article

Elevated Blood Ammonia Level Is a Potential Biological Risk Factor of Behavioral Disorders in Prisoners

1Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 16, Lincui Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China
2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China

Received 11 July 2015; Revised 1 September 2015; Accepted 6 September 2015

Academic Editor: João Quevedo

Copyright © 2015 Yunfeng Duan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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