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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 891651, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/891651
Research Article

Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Houston, TX 77073, USA

Received 24 February 2015; Revised 20 June 2015; Accepted 24 June 2015

Academic Editor: Wai-Kwong Tang

Copyright © 2015 Robert Perna and Jessica Temple. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic () or hemorrhagic stroke () within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program. Participants completed three months of postacute neurorehabilitation and the Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4) at admission and discharge. Admission MPAI-4 scores and level of functioning were comparable. Results. Group ANOVA comparisons show no significant group differences at admission or discharge or difference in change scores. Both groups showed considerably reduced levels of productivity/employment after discharge as compared to preinjury levels. Conclusions. Though the pathophysiology of these types of strokes is different, both ultimately result in ischemic injuries, possibly accounting for lack of findings of differences between groups. In the present study, participants in both groups experienced similar functional levels across all three MPAI-4 domains both at admission and discharge. Limitations of this study include a highly educated sample and few outcome measures.