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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 914134, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/914134
Research Article

Differences according to Sex in Sociosexuality and Infidelity after Traumatic Brain Injury

1Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation (CRIR), Centre de Réadaptation Lucie-Bruneau (CRLB), 2275 Laurier Avenue East, Montréal, QC, Canada H2H 2N8
2Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition (CERNEC), Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Received 21 July 2015; Accepted 23 August 2015

Academic Editor: Hrayr Attarian

Copyright © 2015 Jhon Alexander Moreno and Michelle McKerral. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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