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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1637392, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1637392
Research Article

The Effect of Task-Irrelevant Fearful-Face Distractor on Working Memory Processing in Mild Cognitive Impairment versus Healthy Controls: An Exploratory fMRI Study in Female Participants

1Division of Geriatric Psychiatry at Schulich School of Medicine, Parkwood Institute, Mental Health Care Building, F2-349, London, ON, Canada N6C 0A7
2Lawson Imaging, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada N6A 4V2
3CAMH, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1R8
4Department of Psychiatry at Schulich School of Medicine, The Brain and Mind Institute, Natural Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada N6A 5B7

Received 17 October 2015; Revised 31 December 2015; Accepted 5 January 2016

Academic Editor: Gianfranco Spalletta

Copyright © 2016 Amer M. Burhan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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