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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1378308, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1378308
Research Article

Assessing Cognitive Ability and Simulator-Based Driving Performance in Poststroke Adults

1School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia
2School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden
3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, UHL, County Council, Linköping, Sweden
4School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
5Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Human Factors, Göteborg, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Hoe C. Lee; ua.ude.nitruc@eel.h

Received 18 November 2016; Accepted 14 February 2017; Published 7 May 2017

Academic Editor: Fred S. Sarfo

Copyright © 2017 Alison Blane et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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