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Behavioural Neurology
Volume 2017, Article ID 6261479, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6261479
Clinical Study

Cerebral Reorganization in Subacute Stroke Survivors after Virtual Reality-Based Training: A Preliminary Study

1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Guangdong Engineering Technology Research Center for Rehabilitation Medicine and Clinical Translation, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Luohu People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, China
3Department of Nuclear Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Dong-Feng Huang; nc.ude.usys.liam@fdgnauh and Le Li; nc.ude.usys.liam@5elil

Received 19 December 2016; Revised 12 April 2017; Accepted 31 May 2017; Published 28 June 2017

Academic Editor: Yu Kuang

Copyright © 2017 Xiang Xiao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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