Behavioural Neurology

Impact of Stroke-related Neuropsychological Deficits on Everyday Functioning and Rehabilitation Outcomes


Publishing date
01 Mar 2021
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
13 Nov 2020

1Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SPA SB IRCCS – Istituto di Bari (BA), Bari, Italy

2Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA

3Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Impact of Stroke-related Neuropsychological Deficits on Everyday Functioning and Rehabilitation Outcomes

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

Functional outcomes following stroke focus on the range and quality of daily activities such as work, socialization, and recreation, rather than symptom resolution. Recent research on stroke rehabilitation has advocated that the success of treatment should be measured primarily in terms of functional outcomes and quality of life. Neuropsychological deficits following stroke (e.g., expressive and receptive aphasia) have been shown to exert a substantial impact on functional quality across a variety of activities. In addition, emotional (e.g., depression and anxiety) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (i.e., apathy, delusions, agitation) have been shown to exert a powerful influence on the quality of life of persons with stroke. Also, personality changes, lack of impulse control, and poor concentration are all common symptoms that affect everyday life, as well as the relationships with relatives and friends that have to learn to adapt their behaviour to the patient. Furthermore, social cognitive deficits (e.g., decreased social judgment and impulsivity) following stroke have been shown to be strongly related to long-term adjustment.

Regarding stroke rehabilitation, it is essential to evaluate outcomes using psychometrically-sound measurement tools tailored to the characteristics of the individual with stroke and his/her level of functioning and participation in various activities. The promotion and use of the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in clinical practice is predicated on this principle.

This Special Issue aims to solicit articles reviewing the functional impact of neuropsychological problems following stroke such as language, attention, and memory deficits, as well as neglect and impairment in executive and social cognition. Special attention will be given to identifying promising and innovative diagnostic tools. Articles reviewing stroke rehabilitative intervention shown to reduce the impact of stroke-related impairments on daily life activities and overall quality of life would also be welcomed, as would articles reviewing social support provided to caregivers, the effective burden to be a caregiver and the changes experienced in their quality of life. Review articles that evaluate the overall status of and new directions for stroke rehabilitation will be especially welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Neuropsychological deficits (aphasia, executive deficits, memory deficits) and functional outcome
  • Functional measurement tools
  • Theory of mind and daily life activities
  • Influence of awareness in socioemotional activities
  • The role of psychological and neuropsychiatric disorders in functional outcome
  • The possible influence of cognitive reserve in rehabilitation outcome
  • The caregiver burden, and in general the physical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial stressors associated with the caregiving experience
Behavioural Neurology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision57 days
Acceptance to publication20 days
CiteScore2.900
Impact Factor2.093
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