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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 896474, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/896474
Review Article

ER Stress and Iron Homeostasis: A New Frontier for the UPR

1Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto, Portugal
2Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto, Portugal

Received 12 July 2010; Accepted 1 October 2010

Academic Editor: Emil Pai

Copyright © 2011 Susana J. Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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