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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 925012, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/925012
Research Article

Characterization of Serum Phospholipase A2 Activity in Three Diverse Species of West African Crocodiles

1Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, 450 Beauregard, Kirkman Hall 221A, Lake Charles, LA 70609, USA
2Department of Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Received 27 March 2011; Revised 21 July 2011; Accepted 25 July 2011

Academic Editor: Sanford I. Bernstein

Copyright © 2011 Mark Merchant et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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