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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3757623, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3757623
Research Article

Physical Training Status Determines Oxidative Stress and Redox Changes in Response to an Acute Aerobic Exercise

1Department of Sport Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Guilan, Rasht, Iran
2Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Mohaghegh Ardabili University, Ardabil, Iran
3Medicinal Plants Research Center, Ardabil Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ardabil, Iran
4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran
5Cellular & Molecular Research Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran

Received 19 October 2015; Revised 19 January 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Saad Tayyab

Copyright © 2016 Farnaz Seifi-skishahr et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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