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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9051727, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9051727
Research Article

Molecular Evolution of the Glycosyltransferase 6 Gene Family in Primates

1Laboratório de Genética Humana e Médica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil
2Laboratório de Biologia Molecular “Francisco Mauro Salzano”, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil

Received 12 July 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016

Academic Editor: Stefano Pascarella

Copyright © 2016 Eliane Evanovich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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