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Biochemistry Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9896575, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9896575
Research Article

Potential Antioxidant Activity of New Tetracyclic and Pentacyclic Nonlinear Phenothiazine Derivatives

1Biochemistry, Chemical Sciences Department, Godfrey Okoye University, PMB 01014, Thinkers Corner, Enugu, Nigeria
2Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Sciences Department, Godfrey Okoye University, PMB 01014, Thinkers Corner, Enugu, Nigeria

Received 20 October 2015; Revised 26 February 2016; Accepted 14 March 2016

Academic Editor: Angel Catalá

Copyright © 2016 Godwill Azeh Engwa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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